Reclaiming “Allahu Akbar” from Semantic Pejoration

Allāhu akbar, the Arabic phrase meaning “God is the greatest,” has gained connotations in US public discourse that differ vastly from its meaning among Muslims. Understanding this process may be the first step to reclaiming its positive connotations.

Dancing with the Spirits

Mexico today is gripped by a major sense of despair. The country has become an open field for massive extractive industries, particularly mining and fracking. The so-called war on drugs, has dragged on for over more than a decade and wrecked regional economies, causing widespread migration across and out of the country.

Biocommensurations

Any kind of anthropological future is enmeshed with the future of the people that we study. In my case, these people are psychiatrists. News-style answers to the question of what lies ahead might feature big data, artificial intelligence, or wearable technologies. Yet psychiatry’s future is also more uncertain at the moment than it had been in a long time.

What’s in Your Bag, Anthropologists?

From the Andean highlands to Appalachia, anthropologists from across the discipline open their field bags to reveal favorite pens, recording equipment, emergency granola bars, and—of course—scarves.

Ambivalent Spaces in the (Neo)Liberal Arts

What is the future of anthropology at liberal arts colleges in the United States? In this late capitalist era of unprecedented college costs, student loan debt, and economic uncertainty, the dominant narrative that the role of a college education is to ensure future financial success is understandable, and one to which colleges must respond.

Inside the Annual Meeting Scheduling Process

The American Anthropological Association’s (AAA) 2018 Annual Meeting in San José is on the horizon, and we couldn’t be more excited for the dynamic and diverse collection of presentations, sessions, and other events we have planned. The theme, Resistance, Resilience, and Adaptation: Change in the Anthropological Imagination, is a timely response to our current global political moment.

Written in Blood

When I was sent a link to a Snopes article  asking, “Did DNA Testing Companies Admit to Altering Tests to ‘Screw with Racists’?” (2017), I knew that my research had become “fake news.” Even though I spent years at UCLA’s Institute for Society and Genetics with professors Aaron Panofsky and Christopher Kelty researching the use of DNA ancestry tests by white supremacists, I was not immune from becoming a vector for online propaganda and conspiracy theories.

Senegalese Football’s Impossible Dream

On May 31, 2002, Senegal stunned the football world with a 1-0 victory over the title holders France, a hugely symbolic victory over their former colonizers on the opening day of the 2002 World Cup in Japan and South Korea. A week later, the Lions de la Téranga (the lions of hospitality, the national team’s nickname) faced Denmark. Trailing by one goal at half time, the Senegalese substitute Henri Camara won the ball with a sliding tackle just outside his own penalty area.

Posting at the Margins

“Okay, let’s start the memes,” posted a member of a community Facebook page in the town of Playa del Carmen, shortly after the first presidential debate concluded. Within minutes, the comments section of the post filled with hilarious, insulting, insightful, and downright offensive memes making fun of the five (currently four) presidential candidates.

Transgender Latina Activism in the Current Political Moment

The current political administration poses numerous threats to various minoritized communities in the United States. Anti-Latinx and transphobic sentiments and policy actions are on the rise. Given this state of affairs, one might assume that life is markedly more difficult for transgender Latinxs in the Trump era.