Whose Populism? Which Democracy?

“Populism” conflates widely disparate political projects under one conceptual category. The term demands closer anthropological analysis. [pquote]The assumption that the popular classes are an ignorant, easily manipulated mass is not confined to the political establishment or the liberal corporate media. It is an assumption that many (otherwise) neutral academics may make as well.[/pquote]“The new enemy.” […]

When White Nationalism Became Popular

What rising white nationalism says about race in the 21st century US. On November 12th, 2016 TheDailyStormer.com, a neo-Nazi website with a monthly viewership of over two million lead with the headline, “The Swastika Reigns in Germany! Trump reigns in America!” After the election a popular thread on the white nationalist website Stormfront.org, with over […]

Gina Athena Ulysse

Gina Athena Ulysse is a Haitian born poet-scholar living out the tension between artist and social scientist. She is currently professor of anthropology at Wesleyan University. Her work is unapologetically fierce—she challenges the conventions of the discipline and encourages academics to seek new ways of engaging with the wider public. Her new book Because When […]

Of Populists and Mutants

Venezuela’s public murals depict ongoing relations between “the people” and Chávez. In the days following Donald Trump’s inauguration, a number of Latin American commentators rushed to establish parallels between the new president and Latin American political leaders in the US media. One commentary went as far as defining “[p]opulism, authoritarianism, personalism, machismo, racialism, and caudillismo,” […]

Advertising Populism in Hungary

In 2015 the government used billboards to promote its anti-immigration stance. A satirical opposition hit back.  Visitors to Hungary in in the spring of 2015 were likely to see blue billboards scattered around the country, primarily in the capital city of Budapest. While they may have noticed that several were defaced, it is unlikely they […]

Research in Pain

Sally Campbell Galman is an artist, associate professor of child and family studies at UMass Amherst, and editor of Anthropology and Education Quarterly. Correction: The article in the Anthropology News print magazine 58(3): 14–17, misidentifies Sally Campbell Galman as a professor of anthropology. She is, in fact, a professor of child and family studies at UMass Amherst. Cite as: […]

“Grab ’Em by the Patriarchy”

An emergent feminized/queered resistance could unsettle the masculinist politics of today’s populist leaders.  In an age marked by the global ascendency of right-wing populist politicians, from Donald Trump in the United States to Vladimir Putin in Russia to Tayyip Erdoğan in Turkey, we witness an over-visibility of masculinity as a constitutive part of the political […]

All Populisms Are Not Created Equal

Venezuelans chose between two competing populist projects with starkly different visions of inequality and privilege. Hugo Chávez is back. A seemingly endless stream of commentators insists that the way to understand Donald Trump is by analyzing the practices of the late Venezuelan president. The argument usually pivots around the idea that as a “populist strongman” […]

The Myth of the Apolitical Judge

The problem with the myth of the apolitical judge is that it is part of a discourse that relies on an incomplete set of language ideologies to legitimize conservative judicial philosophies. These language ideologies are incomplete because they promote certain aspects of meaning while obscuring others. Although not political in their own right, these language ideologies do important political work within the judicial confirmation process to “shape and constrain discourse” and position candidates like Gorsuch within the mainstream.