The Politics of Grieving in Turkey

The Death of the Maden Family The Aegean Sea is a graveyard. Like its Mediterranean counterpart, its waters are filled with human bodies that wash up on the shores of Turkey and Greece. You may remember Aylan Kurdi, the three-year-old Syrian. Two winters ago, the image of his lifeless body lying on a Turkish beach […]

The Power of Sports to Change American Ideals

  When the now former National Football League (NFL) quarterback Colin Kaepernick knelt for the national anthem in a preseason game in the summer of 2016, he set off far reaching political waves. He empowered other players to follow suit and provoked the sitting United States president to lash out at kneeling players. But Kaepernick […]

Call for Proposals: #MeToo

As stories of sexual assault and misconduct continue to make news headlines, Anthropology News invites anthropologists to reflect on the #MeToo movement and this particular moment in sexual politics. We would like your reflections on and responses to sexual harassment/violence and aspects of the #MeToo campaign in the context of the kinds of work in […]

Our Most Read Articles of 2017!

We rounded up the most-read articles of 2017. Here’s the top five from In Focus, Opinion, and Section News! Most Read In Focus Articles 5. “The Future of Education is Now” by Cathy N. Davidson 4. ” Tackling the Elephant in the Room” by Kristin L. Krueger 3. “Privilege and the Kinship Chart” by Cerisa R. […]

On Editing

One of the most undervalued, but arduous forms of academic work is editing: organizing knowledge, judging quality, finding emergent themes, and forging connections. Editing is a form of synthesis that works at a thematic level beyond the scope of individual research, and it requires a collaborative and sometimes unhappy interaction with authors; it moves beyond […]

Anthropology and the Rashomon Effect

A reflection on group fieldwork. There is a high-fever-pitch limbic sensation of simultaneously registering something you heard or read as wrong, and the antsy, itchy, compulsion to raise your hand, right there, everyone in the room as your witness. You might write a comment or review, maybe draft an article, or even embark on a […]

Anthropology Matters! in Brief

Anthropology News invited members to report on the AAA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, from reflections on a panels, to gonzo-style reporting, to anthropological impressions of the District.  On “Detained on Trumped up Charges: Migrants and the Ascendant US Security-State” Fiona Murphy 8:00 a.m. Wednesday morning, November 29—After a jetlagged night, I wake in the […]

Refugees and Police Violence in Calais

An anthropologist reflects on ethical responsibility and everyday violence. Sitting on a bench in a beautiful town-center park in Calais, we speak to a number of Ethiopian refugees who tell us they are worried about further confrontation with the police. I am volunteering with a British NGO as part of my fieldwork, and, accompanied by […]

Colonialism’s Orchestrated Disasters in Puerto Rico

“María, María, perdí la esperanza, María, María, perdí la esperanza.” I am reminded of these lyrics from the bomba group, Yuba Iré, when I see the pictures and videos of our beloved nation of Puerto Rico in ruins. Some of us had lived through hurricanes before, but nothing had prepared us for this level of […]

Close Encounters of a Hairy Kind

Hair is something we think we know. Growing spontaneously from our heads, demanding attention throughout our lives, it is intrinsically bound up with our identities and biographies, our sense of who we are. We know it by its appearance, texture, and feel, its ability to frame and represent us or let us down. We are […]