Blue Children and All Shades of Responsibility

Book Review One Blue Child. Asthma, Responsibility, and the Politics of Global Health. Susanna Trnka. Standford: Stanford University Press, 2017. ISBN: 9781503601130. 280pp. Turning red is much “sexier” than turning blue in terms of health symptoms. Many physicians that Trnka interviewed for this book believe that cardiac issues attract more attention than respiratory conditions in […]

The CMA Program and Reception at the 2017 Annual Meeting

CMA is looking forward to this year’s AAA Annual Meeting, taking place November 29–December 2 in Washington, DC. All members are invited to our general Business Meeting (4-0640 in the AAA program) on Friday, December 1, 12:15–1:30 p.m. That evening, we invite you to a members-only reception at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage! Friday, […]

Who Majors in Anthropology, and Why?

First, the bad news: After decades of solid growth, US anthropology bachelor’s degree completions peaked at 11,270 in 2013 and have decreased sharply since then. The year 2016 saw only 9,135 anthropology degrees granted, the fewest since 2009. This is not due to programs shutting down—the number of colleges and universities granting four-year degrees in […]

Is Anthropology Ready for the 21st Century?

Whenever social scientists start rethinking basic issues, they usually begin by interrogating their key analytical categories and assumptions. They may, for example, take terms like “identity” or “sustainability” or “power” apart, pointing the way to new research programs by finding the problematic assumptions or generalizations concealed in such words and their usage. The idea behind […]

Unsettling Anthropology?

Eleven days after the 2016 US presidential election, anthropologists tried to make sense of what happened at an AAA Annual Meeting roundtable sponsored by the American Ethnological Society (AES) and the Society for North American Anthropology (SANA). The co-organizers—current AES board member Shanti Parikh and Angelique Haugerud, former editor-in-chief of American Ethnologist (AE)—asked what the […]

Stop Pretending We Are a Meritocracy

Recently Richard Reeve published an article in the New York Times called “Stop Pretending You’re Not Rich.” He recounts his horror on discovering that the United States was even more class stratified than his native England, and he points to many ways that wealth and privilege are perpetuated by the American system, particularly through our […]

Introduction to “Maintaining Refuge”

This introduction is part of the Maintaining Refuge series. The last few years have witnessed a rising tide of concern about a rising tide of refugees and migrants. As some countries have responded positively, others have moved definitively toward rejection. For refugees and migrants, the navigation of being human and becoming human overlays the navigation of […]