Senegalese Football’s Impossible Dream

On May 31, 2002, Senegal stunned the football world with a 1-0 victory over the title holders France, a hugely symbolic victory over their former colonizers on the opening day of the 2002 World Cup in Japan and South Korea. A week later, the Lions de la Téranga (the lions of hospitality, the national team’s nickname) faced Denmark. Trailing by one goal at half time, the Senegalese substitute Henri Camara won the ball with a sliding tackle just outside his own penalty area.

Translanguaging is Everywhere

For over three years now I’ve been keeping a blog about something I call “citizen sociolinguistics”—the work people do to make sense of everyday communication and share their sense-making with others. This is my small way of supporting the Council on Anthropology and Education’s goal to “promote research, policies and practices” that are “close to the voices of the participant communities” and “sensitive to participant experiences and social contexts.”

Tax Cuts and Higher Education

Tax cuts in the recent past have primarily benefited the richest sections of the American population, with more than a third of all Bush administration tax cuts benefiting the richest 1 percent, leaving barely 20 percent for the lowest earning 60 percent of the population. The rationale driving such tax cuts that overwhelmingly benefit the rich is that once the owners of capital have less of a tax burden, they can invest in the economy, thereby setting in motion dynamics that trickle benefits such as jobs and wages downward to the rest of the population.

Living the Council on Anthropology and Education Mission

What does it mean to be an educational anthropologist in these times? That was one of the questions posed by the Council on Anthropology and Education’s (CAE) Mission Committee at its Town Hall meeting at the 2017 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, DC. The Town Hall was one of many venues at the […]

Graduate Student Paper Prize Winner

“The Neighborhood School Stigma: School Choice, Stratification, and Shame” Over the past decade, social scientists have methodically documented the profound effects of unprecedented charter school growth in urban districts in the United States: stratification. An exodus of students from traditional neighborhood schools to charter schools has driven this growth, creating troubling numbers of vacant seats as […]

When Participants Anticipate Violence

The strengths of anthropology as a discipline are its ability to amplify disenfranchised voices and capture the fine-grained, daily, lived experiences of its participants. The gap between policy actions and their human costs is widening in our current political climate. The rescinding of DACA and local law enforcement cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, force migrants […]