Ethnographic Disruption in the Time of COVID-19

At its best, anthropology strives to understand the complexities of human existence and the ethical and moral dilemmas and choices that face us. The discipline that is invested in documenting societal change will have to formulate ways to work through an event that is unprecedented in most of our lifetimes.

Dear Graduate Student…

Fieldwork can be a contradictory and uncomfortable process. Some thoughts on shyness, relationships, and grace as I refine my own practice.

Considering an Anthropology of the Far Right

Chandra Middleton interviewed anthropologist Nitzan Shoshan, professor in the Center for Sociological Studies at the Colegio de México, about his award-winning book, The Management of Hate.

Refusal as Care

It was my second time attending the neighborhood association meeting in the community where I was doing fieldwork. The association president had invited me, saying he thought it would be great if I talked about my project with the attendees and that, perhaps, some people would want to share about their experiences living under food apartheid.

Watching Our Words

“It’s creepy, don’t you think?” It’s the day after Christmas and I’m walking with my sister-in-law Mette through the woods of Central Jutland, Denmark. She described how, just the other day, she had been speaking with friends about their new dog. Now she keeps seeing targeted advertising from pet food companies on her Facebook feed.

Kathryn Mariner’s Contingent Kinship

In adoption, the child is an imagined future that is produced not only through the investment and circulation of money, but also through practices of observation, waiting, and worry, involving tremendous investments of time and affective energy too. Adoptive kinship is thus highly speculative, in more ways than one. My hope is that within the contemporary climate of neoliberalism, a multivalent concept like intimate speculation can help us think through various social formations beyond adoption.

Observations on Rastafari Cosmopolitics from the Caribbean

“I am Ethiopian just like my neighbor who was born and grew here.” These words were spoken by Ras Henry, a mature Rastafari man who migrated 12,000 kilometers from Jamaica to Ethiopia in the 1970s. Like many other Rastafari, Ras Henry took up the offer of land in the southern Ethiopian city of Shashamane.