What’s in Your Bag, Anthropologists?

From the Andean highlands to Appalachia, anthropologists from across the discipline open their field bags to reveal favorite pens, recording equipment, emergency granola bars, and—of course—scarves.

Local Organizing Runs into a National Campaign in Detroit

I worked as a community and political organizer in Wayne County, Michigan, during the 2016 election. Frustrated by the ignorance and outright dismissal of grassroots strategies by various interest groups and individuals with stakes in the election, I decided to focus my emergent doctoral research on the implications of grassroots organizing in conflict and coordination with other modes of political action.

Changes in the Field

I am writing these “Notes from the Field” in a liminal place of searching for a new fieldwork site: grappling with philosophies regarding the greater good and news of anthropological import as well as my own tragic subjectivity. This personal struggle is also an ethical dilemma that stands at the heart of anthropological theory.

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part Two)

In Part Two of this series, we have more reflections from the authors of “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, on the limitations and liberatory potential for feminist anthropology to address racialized-sexualized-gendered violence in anthropological (activist) research. PART TWO Maya Berry The recent calls that “justice […]

Disciplinary Violence

#MeToo is an opening for change—but can anthropologists look beyond the media moment to confront sexual violence and transform the discipline?

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part One)

In light of their important and timely article, “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, AFA invited authors Maya J. Berry, Claudia Chávez Argüelles, Shanya Cordis, Sarah Ihmoud, and Elizabeth Velásquez Estrada to continue the conversation around decolonizing activist anthropology by centering the embodied experiences of black, brown, and indigenous (queer) women.

“Moving On” from the Ongoing

On March 18, 2018, Stephon “Zoe” Clark was shot in his grandmother’s backyard 20 times, at least six in the back, by two Sacramento Police officers. In the resulting community-led protests, shutdowns, and ceremonies, the 23-year-old father of two has been poignantly mourned for the singular person he was, while his name joins the litany of African-American men, women, boys and girls who have been victims of police aggression and homicide.

Awkward Anthropological Moments

In honor of recent National Awkward Moments Day, March 18, AN invited anthropologists to share their awkward, amusing, embarrassing moments and learning experiences from the field.

TrumPhD

Dear AnthroVice: I recently had a conversation with a PhD student (who is in an anthropology department) who, to my surprise, suggested that he had some strong feelings of support for the Trump agenda, even now. After my head exploded and I stopped throwing things, I got to thinking there might be a better way to handle this. Any suggestions?