Dear Graduate Student…

Fieldwork can be a contradictory and uncomfortable process. Some thoughts on shyness, relationships, and grace as I refine my own practice.

ASAP at the 2019 AAA/CASCA Annual Meeting

Reflecting the global challenge that lies at the center of this year’s conference theme, “Changing Climates: Struggle, Collaboration, and Justice,” and the transnational ties on which the meeting is based, the panels focus on the dynamics of mobility and reflection—on the sociocultural dynamics driving us into the future and an assessment of the trajectories that have led us to this point.

What’s in Your Bag? 2019 Edition

From Amann, Jordan, to the marine environments of the Domincan Republic, anthropologists open their field bags to reveal notebooks, recording equipment, reminders of home, and even a speargun. What’s in your bag?

When Women Take Up Space Not Built for Them

On March 26, 2019, NASA cancelled the first all-female astronaut spacewalk outside the International Space Station. The size medium suits needed by astronauts Christina Koch and Anne McClain were on board, but only one was prepped for a spacewalk. So instead, it was Koch and fellow astronaut Nick Hague who floated outside the space station to install new batteries.

Moonwalk Memories

The topic of the Apollo 11 moonwalk on July 16, 1969, stirred a range of memories for senior anthropologists. Myrdene Anderson, then a graduate student at Yale, even remembers what she had to eat that evening: poached salmon, cooked by fellow grad student Michiko Takaki. Fifty years on however, she feels cause to question her recollections.

A Fieldpoem for World Poetry Day

The difference between a poem and an ethnographic poem is fieldwork. My ethnographic poems are written based on my field data, and sometimes as part of my field methods: they are attentive to the qualia of social life and the complexities of human experience as encountered in fieldwork.