#MeToo, Believing Survivors, and Cooperative Digital Communication

The #MeToo movement—as it emerges in social interaction and digital communication—is a discursive formation that suggests at least two frames of linguistic analysis. This column seeks to unpack the hashtag’s emergence in co-oxygenated social interaction, its transformation through digital communication, and closes with brief thoughts on its limitations for transformative social justice change.

Top Articles of 2018

From critical reflections on the discipline and experiences of it, to grappling with fake news and social media through an anthropological lens, to discussions on race and diversity in the anthropological imagination and the United States more broadly, this year’s top articles speak to major political moments and discipline-specific concerns.

Feminist Anthro in San José

Panels, retrospectives, roundtables, receptions: Please read on for a list of events hosted and sponsored by the Association of Feminist Anthropology. See you in San José!

White Patriarchy Gets a Pacifier

In less than the time it takes you to read this, someone in the United States will be sexually assaulted. One person is assaulted every 98 seconds; almost 37 people in an hour and 888 people a day. There is less than a 1 percent chance that any given perpetrator will go to jail. Rape is underreported, under-prosecuted, and disbelieved. Ours, as anthropologist Peggy Sanday might say, is a rape prone society.

Addressing #MeToo and Exploitation in Anthropology

The explosion of awareness and public conversation on bullying, harassment, sexual violence, and exploitation in recent years can hardly have gone unnoticed by anyone in academia. Access to important archaeological sites has apparently been contingent on securing favor from key “Alpha Males.”

A Seductive Power Disturbing #MeToo

Echoing the global #MeToo movement, Chinese social media have raised a new wave of debates on issues of sexual harassment in Chinese educational institutions. Most critiques attend to the unequal power relations in which faculty members offer scholarly opportunities or advancement in exchange for sexual contacts with students, mostly female.

Call for Proposals: #MeToo

As stories of sexual assault and misconduct continue to make news headlines, Anthropology News invites anthropologists to reflect on the #MeToo movement and this particular moment in sexual politics. We would like your reflections on and responses to sexual harassment/violence and aspects of the #MeToo campaign in the context of the kinds of work in […]