On Editing

One of the most undervalued, but arduous forms of academic work is editing: organizing knowledge, judging quality, finding emergent themes, and forging connections. Editing is a form of synthesis that works at a thematic level beyond the scope of individual research, and it requires a collaborative and sometimes unhappy interaction with authors; it moves beyond […]

“Speaking Justice to Power” Since 1973

The study of politics and law is critical to unpacking the operation of power in society and identifying possible pathways to social change. For contemporary political and legal anthropology, our greatest challenge may be the very unboundedness of that charge, and the almost staggering potential for our work to influence understanding, policy and practice, and […]

Stop Pretending We Are a Meritocracy

Recently Richard Reeve published an article in the New York Times called “Stop Pretending You’re Not Rich.” He recounts his horror on discovering that the United States was even more class stratified than his native England, and he points to many ways that wealth and privilege are perpetuated by the American system, particularly through our […]