Great Ape Haters

In a tweet from 2013, Roseanne Barr called former United Nations National Security Advisor Susan Rice a “big man with swinging ape balls.” This year, Barr was at it again, tweeting “If Muslim brotherhood & planet of the apes had a baby =vj.” VJ was a reference to Valerie Jarett, a former senior advisor to President Barak Obama.

What “Types of Racism” Does Trump Recognize?

Trump’s tweet on the anniversary of Charlottesville fails to conceptualize racism as anything other than a decontextualized form of personal prejudice unconnected to current and historical power relations in US society.

Politics of Sartorial Choices

The first time I ever questioned my decision to become an anthropologist—a listener, a questioner, a participant, an observer on the margins—was during a camping trip before grad school classes started.

Written in Blood

When I was sent a link to a Snopes article  asking, “Did DNA Testing Companies Admit to Altering Tests to ‘Screw with Racists’?” (2017), I knew that my research had become “fake news.” Even though I spent years at UCLA’s Institute for Society and Genetics with professors Aaron Panofsky and Christopher Kelty researching the use of DNA ancestry tests by white supremacists, I was not immune from becoming a vector for online propaganda and conspiracy theories.

AFA’s Live Annual Review 2017

Old favorites, new classics At the AAA Annual Meeting last November, the Association for Feminist Anthropology hosted its first ever “Live Annual Review,” a roundtable reflecting on feminist anthropology as a subfield. Bringing scholars together from a range of career stages, the roundtable sought, as the abstract stated, to “engage in collaborative reflections regarding the […]

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part Two)

In Part Two of this series, we have more reflections from the authors of “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, on the limitations and liberatory potential for feminist anthropology to address racialized-sexualized-gendered violence in anthropological (activist) research. PART TWO Maya Berry The recent calls that “justice […]

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part One)

In light of their important and timely article, “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, AFA invited authors Maya J. Berry, Claudia Chávez Argüelles, Shanya Cordis, Sarah Ihmoud, and Elizabeth Velásquez Estrada to continue the conversation around decolonizing activist anthropology by centering the embodied experiences of black, brown, and indigenous (queer) women.

Martín and the Immigration Forms

A friend of mine from Peru—we’ll call him Martín—recently applied for a visa to attend graduate school in the United States. Moving to the US involved filling out lots of forms, and this presented a dilemma: When I had to mark a category for race, I couldn’t find the word “mestizo,” which is the option […]