White Patriarchy Gets a Pacifier

In less than the time it takes you to read this, someone in the United States will be sexually assaulted. One person is assaulted every 98 seconds; almost 37 people in an hour and 888 people a day. There is less than a 1 percent chance that any given perpetrator will go to jail. Rape is underreported, under-prosecuted, and disbelieved. Ours, as anthropologist Peggy Sanday might say, is a rape prone society.

MPAAC Tackles Sexual Harassment and Border Walls

Since its formal initiation after the 2017 AAA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, the Members’ Programmatic Advisory and Advocacy Committee (MPAAC) has made significant progress in its priority areas. Led by the gender equity seats, Gabriela Torres and Dianna Shady, MPAAC convened the Sexual Harassment Working Group in February 2018.

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part Two)

In Part Two of this series, we have more reflections from the authors of “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, on the limitations and liberatory potential for feminist anthropology to address racialized-sexualized-gendered violence in anthropological (activist) research. PART TWO Maya Berry The recent calls that “justice […]

Disciplinary Violence

#MeToo is an opening for change—but can anthropologists look beyond the media moment to confront sexual violence and transform the discipline?

#MeToo Holds Lessons for Political Resistance

Remember when everyone feared the “normalization” of a Trump presidency? Well, it’s gotten to the point where the US president can now openly brag about lying to the Canadian prime minister, and his bald-faced maneuvers to discredit the Robert Mueller investigation and FBI have been openly joined by House Republicans under the deceptive moniker of “oversight.”

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part One)

In light of their important and timely article, “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, AFA invited authors Maya J. Berry, Claudia Chávez Argüelles, Shanya Cordis, Sarah Ihmoud, and Elizabeth Velásquez Estrada to continue the conversation around decolonizing activist anthropology by centering the embodied experiences of black, brown, and indigenous (queer) women.