Disciplinary Violence

#MeToo is an opening for change—but can anthropologists look beyond the media moment to confront sexual violence and transform the discipline?

Taking Leadership and Remaking Academic Communities

The #MeToo movement simply confirmed and rendered visible the regular incidence of sexual harassment that has all too often shaped the classroom, fieldwork, field training, and the subsequent workplaces of anthropologists since the discipline’s inception.

#MeToo Holds Lessons for Political Resistance

Remember when everyone feared the “normalization” of a Trump presidency? Well, it’s gotten to the point where the US president can now openly brag about lying to the Canadian prime minister, and his bald-faced maneuvers to discredit the Robert Mueller investigation and FBI have been openly joined by House Republicans under the deceptive moniker of “oversight.”

The Highpoint Church Standing Ovation

Was #MeToo washed away in baptismal waters? There is a clip that has been circulating through both conventional broadcast and cable news programs in the United States, as well as on social media sites. It shows a sort of blandly handsome man, on the young side of middle age, garbed in a neutral preppy ensemble: […]

Fieldwork/Fieldplay?

For several weeks I have been trying to figure out if I could write anything on the topic of workplace abuse of power and sexual harassment in anthropology that has not already been said more eloquently by others. I also face a fundamental issue of positionality, given that as senior white male I am one […]