Social and Chemical Life in Mexico City

The most prevalent form of lead exposure in Mexico City today is culinary; lead glazed ceramic dishes that are prized within families. Lead glaze makes the dishes shine and the food taste sweeter, and the enormous ollas (pots) that hang on kitchen walls connect current generations to past and future family celebrations. What if anthropology could tell the broader story of what these pots do, and their effects, by intertwining their social and chemical lives? Our bioethnographic project, Mexican Exposures (MEXPOS), seeks to do just that; we insist that, to understand lead exposure and working-class life in Mexico City, we need to keep glaze, sweetness, celebrations, and toxicity together.

Notes from the Section Leadership

It has been just four years since the Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) was founded and we have sustained the energy that helped launch us. Interest in our section—and in the anthropology of policy—is stronger than ever. Over the past year we have grown by fifty members, making us one of the fastest […]