Upsetting the Canon

At my current institution, a group of interdisciplinary faculty gathers every so often to talk about ways to “decolonize” our syllabi. In our meetings, we discuss how the use of “decolonize” remains fraught and even nonviable given our location on stolen land, and I share with them anthropologist Yarimar Bonilla’s use of “unsettling colonial logics and institutions” (2015) as a modus operandi for thinking about and engaging in such efforts.

Teaching Isn’t All We Do

Although community college faculty typically teach five courses per term and are expected to engage in a significant amount of committee work, many of us still find the time to engage in research. That research can result in college-wide, national, or even international presentations or articles in publications like Practicing Anthropology or American Anthropologist, as […]

Food for Thought

When I first began working at Eastern Kentucky University in the fall of 2018, I taught a module on food insecurity in order to encourage students to pursue applied projects in our local food system. As I presented the syllabus on the first day of class, I saw a number of raised eyebrows and cocked heads. One student slowed me down: “Dr. Green, what do you mean by ‘food insecurity’?”