Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Dec
16
Fri
Mixed Methods Research Training Program for the Health Sciences
Dec 16 all-day

We are accepting applications for the 2017 cohort beginning September 1, 2016.  The deadline for applications to be received is Friday December 16, 2016.  The retreat is planned for June 26-28, 2017 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Mixed Methods Research Training Program for the Health Sciences is funded by the National Institutes of Health through the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research (OBSSR), and is the only program of its kind in the United States.

The program fulfills a national need for training in mixed methods and is a natural next step following the publication of the OBSSR “Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences.”.

Mixed methods research is defined as the collection, analysis, and integration of both quantitative (e.g., RCT outcome) data and qualitative (e.g., observations, interviews) data to provide a more comprehensive understanding of a research problem than might be obtained through quantitative or qualitative research alone. Typical applications of mixed methods in the health sciences involve adding qualitative interviews to follow up on the outcomes of intervention trials, gathering both quantitative and qualitative data to assess patient reactions to a program implemented in a community health setting, or using qualitative data to explain the mechanism of a study correlating behavioral and social factors to specific health outcomes.

An increase in proposals submitted to NIH using mixed methods reflects the growing awareness of the importance of this approach in addressing population and behavioral health.

Mar
31
Fri
The 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 @ 2:57 pm – 3:57 pm

 

Community: Resistance, Reclamation, and Re-Creation

Whose traditions get to be expressed, sanctioned and studied and whose do not?  When the exclusionary dominant version is the worldview accepted as official, what costs do communities outside the dominant group pay in terms of sustaining their traditions? How do power, privilege, whiteness, and intersectionality shape the story? Where are those structures that reinforce or challenge systems of exclusion?

As folklorists, we are committed to exploring the absent, invisible, and counter expressions of communities in our midst. These creations can be sites of re-creating community in the face of disruption, reclaiming traditional knowledge, and resisting the power structures that silence or marginalize them.

This year’s organizing team invites participants to examine, interpret and explore the breadth of this topic. Relevant topics especially include cultural issues facing transnational communities, New Americans and communities of color as well as other communities (e.g., disabilities, LGBTQ) whose identities and cultures have been invisible. The work of public folklorists and folklorists in the schools may have much to offer on this topic as well.  Of course, in addition to this topic, we encourage participants to explore the full dimensions of their scholarship, regardless of topic.

The 128th Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen friendships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required.

You can find more information about the meeting, including instructions for submitting proposals, beginning February 1, 2016, at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2017AM.

 Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2017

Meeting Information:

October 18-21, 2017

Marriott City Center

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Contact info:

Lorraine Walsh Cashman

American Folklore Society

Classroom-Office Building, Indiana University

1800 East Third Street

Bloomington, IN 47405

812-856-2422; fax: 812-856-2483

May
20
Sat
Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar CFP
May 20 all-day

Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar
International Conference
University of Palermo, June 15 – 16, 2017

This conference is an interdisciplinary research project intended for scholars from various fields. The aim is to discuss a historically, anthropologically and politically central country: the United States. Is it possible to see the United States as a country to be examined from multiple points of view – both from near and from afar – with particular interest in the current “anthropological” culture, while also paying attention to history and making predictions about the future? Specialists and enthusiasts from various backgrounds are invited to respond from specific perspectives, in order to compare and contrast different interpretations of the “American galaxy”. To this end, both studies of a theoretical nature and case studies are encouraged. The view from near and from afar, obviously a reference to Lévi-Strauss, alludes to a modus operandi anthropologically based on comparing and contrasting different perspectives. Anthropologists are directly concerned here, because it was in the United States that the much-discussed anthropological Postmodernism recently emerged, and because it was also in the United States that the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, based on studies of Native Americans, was conceived. The reference to “anthropologies” should therefore be viewed literally (anthropologists specializing in the United States in largely ethnographic terms) and with a culturally wider meaning (linguists, comparatists, geographers, semiologists, historians, etc., who observe American culture from their respective epistemological perspectives). The reference to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, aside from being a theoretical inclination shared by the organizers, is a happy necessity for those who study a multicultural country like the United States, with its difficult past of coexistence between colonizers and natives, as well as between the different cultures of which it is composed today.

We offer the following suggestions as possible topics of discussion, from a comparative perspective or otherwise:

  • Native and non-native cultures
  • Ancient/recent migratory phenomena
  • Conformism/individualism
  • Multiculturalism and identity
  • Religious radicalization and New Age movements
  • Processes of globalization and local agency
  • American anthropology/other anthropologies
  • American literature/other literatures
  • The linguistic relativity hypothesis today
  • Everyday cultures
  • Tradition and modernity
  • Processes of homogenization and diversification of knowledge
  • Spaces of imagination
  • Places and non-places
  • Ecologies of landscape
  • Wilderness
  • Languages of power and knowledge
  • Current political situation
  • Politics of inclusion/exclusion
  • Oral histories
  • Etc.

Keynote speaker:
Vincent Crapanzano, City University of New York

Scientific board:
Stefano Montes and Matteo Meschiari

Administrative organization:
Dipartimento Culture e Società
Università degli Studi di Palermo
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italia

For information and to submit proposals:
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Matteo Meschiari ([email protected])

Practical information:
Deadline for submitting proposals: 20 May 2017
Proposal summary and title: 250-300 words
Duration of presentations: 20 minutes
Conference languages: Italian, French and English
Conference participation is free of charge
Travel costs, accommodation expenses and meals are covered by participants or their institutions
Proceedings of the conference will be published

Oct
18
Wed
American Folklore Society 2017 Annual Meeting @ Marriott City Center
Oct 18 – Oct 21 all-day

The American Folklore Society’s 128th annual meeting will take place October 18-21, 2017 at the Marriott City Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

“Community: Resistance, Reclamation and Re-creation” is the theme for the 2017 meeting of the American Folklore Society in Minneapolis because, as folklorists, we are committed to exploring the absent, invisible, and counter narratives of communities in our midst. These narratives can be sites of re-creating community in the face of disruption, reclaiming traditional knowledge, and resisting the power structures that silence or marginalize these narratives.

The preliminary schedule and details for registration and hotel accommodations can be found by visiting the American Folklore Society’s website.

Jun
19
Tue
AAA Department Leaders Summer Institute @ Science and Engineering Hall, George Washington University, Washington DC
Jun 19 @ 6:30 pm – Jun 21 @ 12:30 pm

The AAA Department Leaders Summer Institute is an opportunity to take part in face-to-face dialogue about the various challenges department leaders face in administering their departments and to share successful practices for meeting these challenges.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018
5:00 Registration
6:30 Opening Reception and Dinner (Provided)
Wednesday, June 20, 2018
8:00 Registration and Continental Breakfast
9:00 Welcome and Introductions – AAA President Alex Barker
9:15 Departments as a Force for Change – (Speaker)
10:00 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Leadership and Department Management
-Program Review and Assessment
12:00 Lunch (provided)
1:30 Plenary Discussion – Innovations in Pedagogy and Career Diversity
3:30 Break
3:45 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Doctoral Program Chairs
-MA / MS Program Chairs
-2- and 4-year Degree Program Chairs
5:30 Break
6:00 Dinner (provided) and Fun Evening Event
Thursday, June 21, 2018
8:00 Continental Breakfast
8:30 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Institutional Data
-Encouraging Research and Finding Funding
10:00 Break
10:15 Plenary Discussion – Making the Case for Advancing the Discipline
11:30 AAA’s Department Services Program – How Can AAA Help?
12:00 Wrap Up and Recommendations for 2020 Summer Institute
12.30 Adjourn
Jun
29
Fri
Call for Proposals: Expanding Cooperation on Migration
Jun 29 all-day

The Second Annual Metropolis North American Migration Policy Forum

Expanding Cooperation on Migration: People, Economy, and Security in the Unites States, Mexico and Canada

The Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs, Mexico City

Longstanding migration flows to and through North America are changing. Shifts in patterns—both driving policy change and responding to it—require fresh thinking across borders. Around the world, proliferating crises have increased the number of refugees and asylum seekers on the move, triggering enhanced border security and vetting protocols in many countries. Within North America, a well-worn north-bound migration pattern is complemented by an increasing southward flow to Mexico and beyond. This stream comprises both those who voluntarily migrate and those being repatriated. And within each North American country, there appear growing concerns about the capacity to receive and integrate new arrivals. Publics unevenly perceive the social and economic benefits of migration and question the government’s ability to effectively manage it. At the same time, under NAFTA, North America has seen reduced barriers to trade, investment and cross-border movement of goods and services. However, the agreement is currently under a contentious renegotiation among the three countries. While migration is not a core NAFTA issue, changes or outright cancellation of the agreement could have migration effects.

The second annual Metropolis North America policy forum builds on the foundational understanding gained at the inaugural forum in Washington, and seeks to identify areas where cooperation is occurring, possible and/or desired. Amidst the backdrop of shifting migration patterns and evolving relationships, approaches can benefit from imagination and should consider actors beyond national governments, including subnational levels and other sectors of society. The key aim of the Mexico City forum is to explore where expanded cooperation across the continent on migration can both promote security and grow the economy in all three countries. Building on innovative approaches and ideas, organizers will seek to bolster a North American migration research agenda that can support these opportunities with insight and analysis from a continental perspective.

Find below some suggested themes:

  • Labor Mobility
  • Temporary Foreign Workers
  • Family Migration
  • Economic Migration
  • International Students
  • Refugees
  • Credentials Recognition
  • Migration, Human Rights and the Law
  • Binational and Multinational Migration Agreements
  • Trade and Migration
  • Border Security
  • Border States and Cities
  • Governance of Immigration: The Role of Federal, State/ Provincial Governments
  • Immigration and the Specific Role of Cities and Municipalities
  • Citizenship
  • Public Safety
  • Settlement and Integration
  • Employment Training
  • Unaccompanied Minors
  • Emigration, Deportation and Return Migration

All sessions must have bilateral or trilateral participation from the United States, Mexico and/or Canada.
Workshops (90 minutes):

Workshops will usually consist of four to a maximum of 5 presentations of approximately 15 minutes each followed by at least 20 minutes of discussion. Workshop coordinators will preside over the session or designate another individual to do so.

Roundtables (90 minutes):

The roundtable format is suitable for more informal discussions of emerging issues or to unpack controversial topics. It is a very effective format for the exchange of information and experiences among a relatively small number of people. The organizer or designated person chairs the roundtable with bi/tri national discussants. An 8 person limit per roundtable discussion is recommended because of the desire to actively engage all participants in the session and the physical arrangement of the tables around which the discussions will take place.

SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL
Please note that you will be required to include the following information with your submission:

  • Name and contact information
  • Format of your session (workshop or roundtable)
  • Title of your session
  • Names of co-organizers (if applicable)
  • Names of presenters including their affiliation, email address and titles of their presentation
  • 50-word abstract which will be included in the program (please make sure it is descriptive, but is also formulated to interest as many conference participants as possible)
  • 250-word summary for consideration by the Adjudication Committee Your proposal should be emailed to Sarah Kooi ([email protected])
    by June 29th, 2018.