Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Nov
21
Mon
Call for Submissions: CSocD55 Photo Exhibition
Nov 21 all-day

Call for Submissions for the CSocD55 Photo Exhibition

Deadline: 21 November 2016

 

For 2017, the 55th session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD55) has selected the following priority theme: “Strategies for the eradication of poverty to achieve sustainable development for all”. As part of its activities for CSocD55, the UNDESA’s Division for Social Policy and Development (DSPD) is hosting a photo exhibition at United Nations Headquarters in New York City from 1-10 February 2017, during the Commission. Photos selected for the exhibition will be viewed by the many visitors to the UN, including government officials, experts, and NGO representatives during this important event, and will be included in an online exhibition brochure distributed to key partners and stakeholders.

 

Learn more: http://bit.ly/csocd55-exhibition

Jan
18
Wed
One Day Conference: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Jan 18 all-day

This one-day conference is being launched as an ‘In Dialogue with anthropologists’ series to consider active engagement and potential to intervene in the conversation to bring about change on pressing socio-political and related issues. It facilitates spaces for anthropologists and other academics to engage with practitioners, policy-makers, media analysts among others on certain pressing contemporary issues.

Professor Nigel Rapport, University of St Andrews, in an opening plenary will offer a talk on ‘’Freedom, from the perspective of a cosmopolitan anthropology of Anyone, the global human individual’. The conference will engage with debates and related research on contemporary issues through anthropological insights

Other confirmed speakers include Tom Selwyn, SOAS, Pat Caplan, Goldsmiths, University of London, David Shankland, Director of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Patrick Alexander, Oxford Brookes University, Charlotte Joy, Goldsmiths, University of London, Gabriel Dattetreyen, Goldsmiths, University of London, Narmala Halstead, University of East London, Christine McCourt, City, University of London, Nicola Frost, Independent Scholar, Dave Cook, University College London, Paul Gilbert, University of Brighton, Jessica Sklair, Goldsmiths, University of London, Flavia Kremer, University of Manchester.

The conference will incorporate innovative formats where some speakers will be ‘accompanied’ by debaters/ interlocutors to open research conversations and demonstrate wider civic and socio-political engagement. Sessions will incorporate and reflect on ‘truths’ and ‘post-truths.’ Topics include Brexit, pasts and futures. The conference will include sessions by students doing fieldwork, where some will engage with research participants to discuss their work and consider wider relevance. It will offer a mini photographic exhibition.

Some of the material presented on the day will be podcast and student filmmakers will be present to capture side conversations from speakers and delegates for three and five-minutes access film shorts.

The conference will offer sessions and presentations on anthropological research, dialogue, impact and wider debates. It has a focus on sessions where anthropologists will engage with practitioners, media analysts and others.

It invited practice-based sessions incorporating text, visual material and other innovative modes of presentations to showcase the value of research and its wider relevance. It includes position papers as well as ethnographic accounts.

Some of the pressing contemporary concerns include:

  • Debates on the person
  • Debates on migration
  • Debates on HE and uses of academic knowledge
  • Debates on political events and significant socio-political issues including Brexit
  • Debates on the role of media and social media in empowering and disempowering people
  • The conference considers that ethnographic knowledge and practice offer spaces to reflect and intervene in these and other issues. It considers the spaces to continue conversations on scholarly research contributions and the spaces for wider impact

Organised by the Anthropology and Contemporary Research Worlds Group.

Please contact: Narmala Halstead  [email protected]

Feb
1
Wed
NGO Participation at the 55th Session of the Commission for Social Development @ United Nations Headquarters
Feb 1 – Feb 10 all-day

NGO Participation at the 55th Session of the Commission for Social Development

 

The Fifty-Fifth Session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD55) will take place from 1 to 10 February 2017 at United Nations Headquarters in New York under the priority theme “Strategies for the eradication of poverty to achieve sustainable development for all”.

From 30-31 January 2017, a Civil Society Forum will be convened at UN Headquarters. The Forum is hosted jointly by UNDESA-DSPD, the NGO Committee for Social Development (https://ngosocdev.org/) and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung.

 

Learn more about NGO Participation at the CSocD55 here: https://www.un.org/development/desa/civil-society/csocd55.html

Mar
3
Fri
Call for Papers: Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity: on Matters of Method in Postsocialist Studies @ Indiana University Bloomington
Mar 3 – Mar 4 all-day

Call for Papers

The 2017 Annual Soyuz Symposium

Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity: on Matters of Method in Postsocialist Studies

Russian and East European Institute

Indiana University Bloomington

March 3-4, 2017

 

Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies invites presentation proposals for the 2017 symposium hosted by the Russian and East European Institute at Indiana University Bloomington. We are seeking research papers and visual presentations (including, but not limited to documentary and ethnographic films) that engage with the issues of methodology in the postsocialist world broadly defined, encompassing  East-Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union, as well as Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Our goal is to foster conversations about knowledge production in the field of postsocialist studies that spans generations of researchers: from graduate students and junior scholars to senior professionals. The 2017 Soyuz Symposium theme Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity is inspired by the immense and somewhat untapped potential that postsocialist studies have to offer to methodological conversations in social sciences. In our view, a more vibrant scholarly exchange will aid current compartmentalization of much scholarship into global North and South and produce new analytical categories. Recent resurgence of Cold War ideologies in Europe has ushered a renewed interest in this region on the part of policy makers, funding organizations, and academic programs, and we want to invite scholars of postsocialism to provide their critical commentary on the issues that have accompanied these geopolitical shifts.

Embracing Confusion and Questioning Clarity theme encourages presenters to consider questions they have faced and discoveries they have made on a journey from conceiving a research idea to their interpretation of findings. In what ways have postsocialist transformations and the scholarly analyses that followed posed a challenge to long-standing social scientific categories, methods and theories? What portable analytical categories and methodological insights have postsocialist studies yielded? How have our methodological frameworks and research questions changed in the last decades? Which conversations, interpretive frames, and collaborative processes were beneficial and which were not? What sorts of creative responses have scholars of postsocialism generated to navigate confusing times? And how do insights gleaned by earlier generations of researchers translate, travel and land in the world nearly thirty years removed from the iconic fall of the Berlin Wall?

Invited themes include, but are not limited to the following: creating knowledge about a space; methodologies of data collection and analysis; fieldwork events; analysis of state narratives and discourses; interpretation of contested histories; conducting policy-relevant research; writing in social sciences, and others. As always, at Soyuz, other topics of research on postsocialism that are not directly related to this theme are also welcome. We will invite selected papers for publication as a special issue in one of the relevant journals. Partial funding might be available for graduate students, please indicate if you’d like to be considered in your materials.

 

Abstracts of up to 250 words should be sent to Soyuz board at [email protected] by October 15, 2016.

 

Please include your full name, affiliation, and paper title. Write “Soyuz 2017” in the subject line of your email. Papers will be selected and notifications made by December 1, 2016.

The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary forum for exchanging work based on field research in postsocialist countries, ranging from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union to Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. Soyuz is an interest group in the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and an official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES). The Soyuz symposium has met annually since 1991 and offers an opportunity for scholars to interact in a more personal setting. More information on the Soyuz Research Network can be found at the website.

Sep
30
Sat
VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association CFP
Sep 30 all-day

VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association
Philadelphia, March 15-18, 2018
Keynote: Elizabeth Milroy (Drexel University)

In honor of the 100th anniversary of Philadelphia’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the NCSA committee invites proposals that explore the notion of the vista in the nineteenth century. From personal gardens to public parks, from the street level to the top of a skyscraper, or from the microscope to the panoramic photograph, the nineteenth century was a moment when the idea of the vista changed from a narrow sightline to a sweeping, expansive view. How did theorists alter our historical perspective, broadening our notion of the world through science or religion? In what ways did power systems affect urban vantage points? How did man-made vistas reflect socio-cultural ideals? How did domestic spaces or nightlife transform with the widespread use of gas or electric lighting? How does the conceptual vista operate metaphorically? Topics might include horticulture, landscapes and seascapes, new technology, photography, sightseeing, film and the theater, urban planning, visions and dreamscapes, shifting perceptions of the gaze, or literary or artistic descriptions or depictions of viewpoints. In contrast, papers may consider the absence of vistas, such as mental or physical confinement or elements that obfuscate a view.

Please send 250-word abstracts with one-page CVs to [email protected] by September 30th, 2017. Abstracts should include the author’s name, institutional affiliation, and paper title in the heading. We welcome individual proposals and panel proposals with four presenters and a moderator. Note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend if accepted. Presenters will be notified in November 2017. We encourage submissions from graduate students, and those whose proposals have been accepted may submit complete papers to apply for a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses. Scholars who reside outside of North America and whose proposals have been accepted may submit a full paper to be considered for the International Scholar Travel Grant (see the NCSA website for additional requirements: http://www.ncsaweb.net).

Oct
20
Fri
APA Technology, Mind, and Society Call for Papers
Oct 20 all-day
The American Psychological Association will hold an interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society in Washington, DC, on April 5-7, 2018. Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world are invited to participate in the event.

The conference will provide a venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference will feature four keynote speakers: Cynthia Breazeal (MIT), Justine Cassell (Carnegie Mellon), Eric Horvitz (Microsoft Research), and Sandy Pentland (MIT).

APA invites you and your colleagues and students to submit papers, symposia, and posters for this conference, which will be organized around the following broad themes:

  • Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics.
  • Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research.
  • Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace.
  • Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions.

The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here.

The conference is open to researchers, professionals, and students in all relevant areas, including psychology and other behavioral and social sciences, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, design, health research, education research, city and regional planning, public policy, history of science and technology, and philosophy.

The conference aims to address the full range of contemporary and emerging technologies. These include but are not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile devices, social media, virtual/augmented reality, gaming, geographic information systems, autonomous vehicles, and biomedical technologies (e.g., brain-machine interfaces, genetic engineering).

APA is sponsoring the conference in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Association for Computing Machinery — Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI).

We look forward to seeing you at the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference! For additional information, see the conference website. If you have any questions, please contact the APA Science Directorate ([email protected]).

VISIT THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE!
Mar
22
Thu
Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness (SAC) Spring Conference: Altered States, Sound, Ritual and Healing Today, Both in Traditional Cultures and Non Traditional
Mar 22 – Mar 25 all-day

Healing is one function attributed to shamanic practice and is fundamental to many of the esoteric principals of ritual and spiritual healing beliefs that have been part of our world’s cultures. Sound weather chanting, sacred sounds, and instruments of varying types are also used to form the vessel of healing. Exploring the various uses and meaning of ritual, sound, and altered states invites a deeper understanding of why these elements are conflated into the healing arts of many cultures ancient and newly forming sub-cultures around the world.  The theme of the 2018 conference concerns the diverse ways in which these healing practices are used and being transformed by technology and modern world philosophy; and how these modalities of sound and ritual have significance in healing practices around the world today.