Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Nov
26
Sat
Global Sustainable Transport Conference
Nov 26 – Nov 27 all-day

7 October – Side event registration

31 October – Conference registration

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will convene the first-ever Global Sustainable Transport Conference from 26-27 November 2016 in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan.

The Conference will be held at the highest level and will bring together key stakeholders from Governments, the private sector, and civil society to engage in dialogue that emphasizes the integrated and cross-cutting nature of sustainable transport.  All modes of transport—road, rail, aviation and maritime—will be addressed as well as transport both in urban and rural areas, energy and transport, public transport, countries in special situations, road safety, and financing for sustainable transport, as well as finding a new paradigm for transport sustainability.  The concerns of developing countries, including least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, will receive particular attention.

The Conference will feature opening and closing ceremonies, morning plenary sessions with statements of commitment and ambition, followed by parallel thematic roundtables on various sustainable transport-related topics.  NGO representatives will be able to attend the plenaries, intervene in the round tables, subject to the availability of time, and organise side events.

Pre-registration is required and will be open for NGOs in consultative status with the Economic and Social Council from 19 September – 31 October 2016, using the registration form at http://bit.ly/SustainableTransportConf. Registration is non-transferrable.  If a representative of an accredited organization is not able to attend the Conference, he or she cannot be replaced by another representative.

Applicants must:

  • represent an NGO in consultative status with ECOSOC working in the transport field;
  • be officially authorised to speak on behalf of their organization or institution;
  • have expertise in the transport sector;
  • be available to be in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan on 26 and 27 November;
  • arrange for travel, visa, accommodation and all other related expenses.

IMPORTANT: Government representatives and intergovernmental organizations DO NOT use this registration form.  Please observe standard protocol arrangements via your official UN delegation or organization.

The deadline for submitting applications for side events is 7 October 2016.  For more information on the Conference and organising side events, please visit the Global Sustainable Transport Conference website: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/Global-Sustainable-Transport-Conference-2016.

Jan
18
Wed
One Day Conference: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Jan 18 all-day

This one-day conference is being launched as an ‘In Dialogue with anthropologists’ series to consider active engagement and potential to intervene in the conversation to bring about change on pressing socio-political and related issues. It facilitates spaces for anthropologists and other academics to engage with practitioners, policy-makers, media analysts among others on certain pressing contemporary issues.

Professor Nigel Rapport, University of St Andrews, in an opening plenary will offer a talk on ‘’Freedom, from the perspective of a cosmopolitan anthropology of Anyone, the global human individual’. The conference will engage with debates and related research on contemporary issues through anthropological insights

Other confirmed speakers include Tom Selwyn, SOAS, Pat Caplan, Goldsmiths, University of London, David Shankland, Director of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Patrick Alexander, Oxford Brookes University, Charlotte Joy, Goldsmiths, University of London, Gabriel Dattetreyen, Goldsmiths, University of London, Narmala Halstead, University of East London, Christine McCourt, City, University of London, Nicola Frost, Independent Scholar, Dave Cook, University College London, Paul Gilbert, University of Brighton, Jessica Sklair, Goldsmiths, University of London, Flavia Kremer, University of Manchester.

The conference will incorporate innovative formats where some speakers will be ‘accompanied’ by debaters/ interlocutors to open research conversations and demonstrate wider civic and socio-political engagement. Sessions will incorporate and reflect on ‘truths’ and ‘post-truths.’ Topics include Brexit, pasts and futures. The conference will include sessions by students doing fieldwork, where some will engage with research participants to discuss their work and consider wider relevance. It will offer a mini photographic exhibition.

Some of the material presented on the day will be podcast and student filmmakers will be present to capture side conversations from speakers and delegates for three and five-minutes access film shorts.

The conference will offer sessions and presentations on anthropological research, dialogue, impact and wider debates. It has a focus on sessions where anthropologists will engage with practitioners, media analysts and others.

It invited practice-based sessions incorporating text, visual material and other innovative modes of presentations to showcase the value of research and its wider relevance. It includes position papers as well as ethnographic accounts.

Some of the pressing contemporary concerns include:

  • Debates on the person
  • Debates on migration
  • Debates on HE and uses of academic knowledge
  • Debates on political events and significant socio-political issues including Brexit
  • Debates on the role of media and social media in empowering and disempowering people
  • The conference considers that ethnographic knowledge and practice offer spaces to reflect and intervene in these and other issues. It considers the spaces to continue conversations on scholarly research contributions and the spaces for wider impact

Organised by the Anthropology and Contemporary Research Worlds Group.

Please contact: Narmala Halstead  [email protected]

May
19
Fri
Conference- The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Slavery @ Brooklyn College, City University of New York
May 19 – May 20 all-day

The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Slavery

A conference in the Fredric Ewen Series on Civil Liberties and Academic Freedom, 19-20 May 2017

Brooklyn College, City University of New York

The rhetorics of freedom and liberty permeate contemporary and historical political discourse. This language and its associated symbols is invariably positively connoted from the perspective of the speaker and the presumed audience. However, the associated values and defining principles shift dramatically in each social context. In short we can all agree freedom is good, but we cannot agree what it means to be free. One of the key sites of contention in such discourse is what needs to be sacrificed in order to achieve liberty and what costs are associated with the preservation of freedom. The valuation of liberty is directly linked to whose freedom is prioritized and who is seen as bearing the associated costs. All of this is especially true in any discussion of slavery.

The aim of this conference is to bring scholars from numerous disciplines into conversation across the historical timeline. Just as freedom and liberty are slippery concepts, so are ideas of debt, value, and payment. But rather than simply viewing these terms as rhetorical devices that make freedom seem worthwhile, we deploy debt, value,and payment as analytical tools for understanding how freedom works – while also keeping in mind that these are concepts that themselves demand investigation. These ideas unite the discourses of freedom and liberty, from ethical and economic discourses, which describe freedom as either physical labor or a mental activity, as well as the language of religion and science. Often our innumerable ways of assessing value bleed one into another, especially in conversations regarding individual and shared liberties.

By explicitly juxtaposing the different methodologies used in asking “what does freedom cost?” from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present, we hope to explore overlapping areas of research and help expand the existing conversations in each discipline. In addition to providing vocabularies, practices and theories of freedom that we still use today, Ancient Greece and Rome provide many examples of peoples who lacked freedom but strove to obtain it, including slaves, women and conquered peoples. By simultaneously examining the Greco-Roman antiquity and modernity, we bring to light recurrent historical patterns of the costs that people have and continue pay for freedom.

Our ultimate goal is to produce a rigorous edited volume of the most substantial and unified conference contributions for publication by a major university press.

Our confirmed keynote speakers include, Orlando Patterson (John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Harvard University), Saidiya Hartman (Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University) and Deborah Kamen (Associate Professor, Classics, University of Washington).  We are seeking contributions for at least four panels of 3-4 participants each.  We hope to attract participation from a wide range of academic disciplines and from scholars at all levels, and will try to reflect this diversity in our creation of each broad panel.  Examples of possible panel titles might be: “Themes of Freedom and Payment in the Novel”, “The Economics of Emancipation”, “Cross-Cultural Political Theories of Sacrifices and Liberty”, “Comparative Histories of Debt-Bondage”, or “The Shifting Demographics of Civil Liberties”.

 

We will be offering a minimum of six bursaries of up to 500 dollars to be awarded on the basis of greatest need, taking into account access to institutional funding and the distance of the conference from the participant’s home institution.

 

31 October 2016 is the deadline for the submission of abstracts. Please include the following as separate files:  (1) title, abstract of 300-500 words, a one page bibliography (no self identifying information please!); (2) your name, title of your proposed talk, institutional affiliation, short academic bio, and an indication of whether you’d like to be consider for a bursary, a budget for the amount requested, and any information we should take into consideration when making our bursary allocations.

These two files (PDF or MSWord preferred) should be sent to: [email protected]

General questions on this conference should be sent to: [email protected]

 

We hope to notify successful applicants by 15 November.

31 March 2017 will be the deadline for submission of draft papers for pre-circulation among fellow panelists and organizers.

We will also invite poster submissions from undergraduates conducting research on related themes; the deadline for poster proposals will be 1 March 2017.

Oct
20
Fri
APA Technology, Mind, and Society Call for Papers
Oct 20 all-day
The American Psychological Association will hold an interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society in Washington, DC, on April 5-7, 2018. Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world are invited to participate in the event.

The conference will provide a venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference will feature four keynote speakers: Cynthia Breazeal (MIT), Justine Cassell (Carnegie Mellon), Eric Horvitz (Microsoft Research), and Sandy Pentland (MIT).

APA invites you and your colleagues and students to submit papers, symposia, and posters for this conference, which will be organized around the following broad themes:

  • Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics.
  • Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research.
  • Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace.
  • Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions.

The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here.

The conference is open to researchers, professionals, and students in all relevant areas, including psychology and other behavioral and social sciences, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, design, health research, education research, city and regional planning, public policy, history of science and technology, and philosophy.

The conference aims to address the full range of contemporary and emerging technologies. These include but are not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile devices, social media, virtual/augmented reality, gaming, geographic information systems, autonomous vehicles, and biomedical technologies (e.g., brain-machine interfaces, genetic engineering).

APA is sponsoring the conference in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Association for Computing Machinery — Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI).

We look forward to seeing you at the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference! For additional information, see the conference website. If you have any questions, please contact the APA Science Directorate ([email protected]).

VISIT THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE!
Apr
19
Thu
Society for Cultural Anthropology (SCA) and Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Joint Virtual Spring Conference: Displacements @ Virtual
Apr 19 – Apr 21 all-day

Displacements are in the air: episodes of profound political upheaval, intensified crises of migration and expulsion, the disturbing specter of climatic and environmental instability, countless virtual shadows cast over the here and now by ubiquitous media technologies. What does it mean to live and strive in the face of such movements? What social and historical coordinates are at stake with these challenges? And what kind of understanding can anthropology contribute to the displacements of this time—given, especially, that our most essential techniques like ethnography are themselves predicated on the heuristic value of displacement, on what can be gleaned from the experience of unfamiliar circumstances?

Exclusionary politics of spatial displacement always depend on rhetorical and imaginative displacements of various kinds: a person for a category, or a population for a problem. In the face of such moves, the critical task of ethnography is often to muster contrary displacements of thought, attention, imagination, and sensation. What forms of social and political possibility might be kindled by anthropological efforts to broach unexpected places, situations, and stories? The 2018 SCA Biennial Meeting, cosponsored by the Society for Visual Anthropology, will invite such prospects in tangible form, as experiences of what is elsewhere and otherwise. This is a conference that will itself displace the conventional modes of gathering, taking place wherever its participants individually and collectively tune in.

For the first time, in 2018, the SCA Biennial Meeting will take place as a virtual conference. We invite you to contribute an individual audio/video presentation up to 10 minutes in length, a proposal for a panel of related presentations, or an idea for some localized form of in-person collaboration to which conference participants could have access. You may simply choose to record yourself giving a talk or reading a paper. But we especially encourage efforts to take us elsewhere along with you in a more sensory and immersive register: multimedia presentations, voiceover essays spliced with fieldwork fragments, sound works, short films, photo sequences, and so on. In this spirit, here is another call for submissions to the Biennial Meeting, one expressed in a different manner.

Air travel is one of the fastest growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, and one of the chief ways that an academic livelihood contributes to carbon pollution. We are exploring the virtual conference format with the ideal of carbon-neutral activity in mind. This format will also enable broader geographical participation, most especially against the backdrop of a political climate of unequal restrictions on international travel. We hope, too, that the web-based media platform we are developing for the conference will allow for novel explorations of expressive form in anthropology.

One of the chief values of the academic conference no doubt lies in face-to-face meetings and interactions. We hope, however, that this effort may provoke decentralized, affinity-based forms of collaboration, interaction, and uptake, in the spirit of experimentation that the SCA and SVA have long encouraged. We therefore invite participants to consider gathering together into local nodes of collective participation in the conference: viewing parties, classroom activities, departmental engagements with the conference, hackathon-style events that culminate in outputs that can be shared with other conference attendees, or anything else you can imagine.

All presentations must be prerecorded and shared in advance with the organizers. The presentations will be posted sequentially, in real time, during the conference and will be available to registered conference attendees for viewing, commentary, and discussion over those three days. We are exploring the possibility of a digital archive of presentations for those who want to participate, although more ephemeral contributions are also welcome.

Technical guidance on presentations will be forthcoming soon, but we want to assure you that nothing more complicated is required than what can be done on a typical smartphone. In the meantime, if you are conducting fieldwork, feel free to start gathering audiovisual materials that you may wish to incorporate in your presentation (in keeping with the research ethics of your particular field site). Also, keep in mind that if you would like to organize a local node of collective participation, we will work with you to provide some form of support for your event.

Oct
9
Tue
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC) @ East-West Center
Oct 9 – Oct 12 all-day

EPIC is the premier international gathering on the current and future practice of ethnography and design in the business world.

EPIC people create better business strategies, processes, and products, as well as enhance people’s lives, by illuminating the arc of social change through theory and practice. Our conference is a diverse gathering of interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners from every industry, including Fortune-500 companies, technology firms, management consultancies and design studios, universities and NGOs, public policy organizations and think tanks. Through the formal program and informal networking opportunities, EPIC attendees share leading expertise, gain new knowledge and skills, find business partners and opportunities, and make the invaluable connections that have grown EPIC into an essential, year-round community.

Conference submissions go through a rigorous, double-blind peer review process and are published in open access proceedings accessible through AnthroSource and epicpeople.org/intelligences.

Information about past conference is available here.