Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
21
Sat
Secrets of the Shining Sword
Apr 21 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

May
3
Thu
Arctic Explorer Symposium at the Embassy of Canada
May 3 @ 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm
May
15
Tue
Forensic Anthropology Uncovers the Mysterious Death of Kennicott  @ Ground Floor, National Museum of Natural History
May 15 @ 6:45 pm – 8:00 pm
Forensic Anthropology Uncovers the Mysterious Death of Kennicott 
Q?rius Theater

FREE ticketed event

150 years ago a young American scientist named Robert Kennicott, one of the founders of the Smithsonian, set out for a walk into the Alaskan wilderness while on an expedition to the Yukon and was never heard from again.

The mystery of his death shook the nation and his crew. No one knew how or why he died, and rumors of suicide by swallowing strychnine have circled ever since. That is, until 2001, when Doug Owsley and Kari Bruwelheide, renowned forensic anthropologists at the National Museum of Natural History, traveled to the Grove in Glenview, Illinois, Robert Kennicott’s boyhood home, to open the naturalist’s casket and determine the cause of his death.

Hear more from Kari Bruwelheide on how science and an iron coffin provided a new lens to solve the mystery of Kennicott’s death. 

After the program, get a chance to engage with Kari Bruwelheide and see an iron coffin from our Anthropology collection. 

This program is presented as part of the Beyond the Exhibition: Objects of Wonder series, which offers opportunities to look more closely at some of the objects in the acclaimed Objects of Wonder exhibition at the National Museum of Natural History. 

The Objects of Wonder exhibition is located on the second floor of the National Museum of Natural History. Open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily.


Accessibility Information

The National Museum of Natural History is committed to providing inclusive experiences for all audiences. Please contact 202-633-3611 or email [email protected] for access services. To view and print a map with accessible entrances, curb cuts, designated parking, and more for Smithsonian facilities on the National Mall, please download the Accessibility Map here.

Assistive Listening SystemsThe Q?rius Theater contains an induction loop.

Assisted listening devices are also available in the Q?rius Theater.

 

Sign Language Interpretation

If you would like to have a sign language interpreter or real-time captioning (CART), you should call (202) 633-3611 or send an e-mail to [email protected]. Please allow time to schedule the request by contacting the Accessbility Office at least 2 weeks prior to the program. We will do our best to accomodate last-minute requests.


Date:  
Time: 6:45 PM – 8:30 PM 
Address:
Ground Floor, National Museum of Natural History
10th St. and Constitution Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20013-7012 
United States

 

If you’d like to attend this event you can purchase tickets online.

May
31
Thu
Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2018
May 31 all-day

International Call for Nominations: Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2018

The Parkes Foundation invites nominations for the 2018 Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture on human/biosocial sciences

The lecture is awarded annually in Geoffrey Harrison’s honour to persons who have made a substantial and sustained contribution to the study of the human biology of living populations and especially biosocial sciences.

Nominations and self-nominations are welcome and must be accompanied by a CV of no more than two A4 pages (set in Arial font size 12). Please submit nominations via email to Mrs Caroline Edgley ([email protected]).

The closing date for nominations is Thursday 31st May 2018 and the lecture will take place on Friday 9th November 2018 followed by a drinks reception at the Natural History Museum in Oxford. The Parkes Foundation will contribute to travel and accommodation of the speaker.

Aug
31
Fri
2018-2019 Psyche Inspired Program
Aug 31 all-day

THE APPLICATION FOR THE 2018-2019 PSYCHE INSPIRED PROGRAM IS NOW AVAILABLE!

The Psyche mission invites full-time, enrolled undergraduate students from universities and community colleges in the United States and its territories to apply to become part of this year’s cohort of creative interns.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA AND ACCESS THE APPLICATION

PSYCHE INSPIRED OVERVIEW

Psyche Inspired is a program that brings undergraduate students from any discipline or major together to share the excitement, innovation, and scientific and engineering content of NASA’s Psyche mission with the public in new ways through artistic and creative works. These works are posted below and highlighted on Twitter and Facebook. View the full resolution images in the image gallery.

Psyche Inspired was piloted at ASU during the 2017-2018 academic year.

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Friday, August 31, 2018 at 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

Psyche Inspired is open to all talented, creative full-time enrolled undergraduate students at universities and community colleges in the United States or its territories, regardless of major.

(Previous Psyche Inspired interns have come from a variety of majors, including astrobiology, biogeoscience, ceramics, computer science, digital culture, drawing, electrical engineering, engineering management, English, geology, graphic design, materials science, music, painting, and sculpture.)

To be eligible, an applicant must:

  • Be a current full-time enrolled undergraduate student at a university or community college in the United States and its territories.
  • Not be graduating any earlier than the end of the spring semester 2019 (nominally no earlier than May 2019).
  • Commit to creating four original creative works over the period of the program (approximately one work per two months through May 2019).
  • Be willing to sign an intellectual property agreement with Arizona State University.
  • Commit to attending the weekly required meeting (either in person, if they are based near ASU, or by phone or WebEx) on Fridays at 11 a.m. Pacific Time through the entirety of the program (through May 2019).
  • Commit to responding to all communications from the program in a timely manner (within 48 hours).

Applicants are not required to be U.S. citizens.

APPLICATION PREPARATION

Applicants should be prepared to answer:

  • Why do you want to be part of Psyche Inspired? (1000 characters or less, including spaces)
  • Why do you think you are a good candidate for Psyche Inspired? (1000 characters or less, including spaces)
  • Please describe a time or experience where you had to work independently to get a task or project done. How did you keep yourself motivated and on-track? (1000 characters or less, including spaces)

Applicants must submit 3 sample works of their choosing with short descriptions of each work. Required specifications for sample work options:

  • Sample Images: Minimum resolution of 1024 x 786; must be uploaded as PNG, JPG, or TIF (10 MB max).
  • Sample Written Work: Maximum of 1000 characters (including spaces) per sample; must be uploaded as PDF (10 MB max).
  • Sample Audio: Maximum length: 2 minutes; must be posted on YouTube or Vimeo (provide link).
  • Sample Video: Maximum length: 2 minutes; must be posted on YouTube or Vimeo (provide link).

Applicants must provide the name, title, and official email address of a faculty or staff member at their university or community college who can serve as a reference.

Oct
22
Mon
Call for Nominations: 2019 Alan T. Waterman Award
Oct 22 all-day

THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION’S HIGHEST HONOR

The Alan T. Waterman Award is the highest honor awarded by the National Science Foundation for promising, early-career researchers. The annual award has been bestowed upon early career scientists and engineers since 1975, when Congress established the award to honor the agency’s first director. The annual award recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by the National Science Foundation. In addition to a medal, the awardee receives a grant of $1,000,000 over a five-year period for scientific research or advanced study in the mathematical, physical, biological, engineering, social or other sciences at the institution of the recipient’s choice.

Eligibility and Selection Criteria
Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, 40 years of age or younger, or no more than 10 years beyond receipt of their Ph.D. degrees by December 31 of the year in which they are nominated. Candidates should have demonstrated exceptional individual achievements in scientific or engineering research of sufficient quality to place them at the forefront of their peers. Criteria include originality, innovation, and significant impact on their field.

For more information, contact:
Dr. Sherrie B. Green, Program Manager
Phone: 703-292-8040
Email: [email protected]

To nominate a candidate, please go to: www.fastlane.nsf.gov/honawards

Information on the award and past recipients is also available at: www.nsf.gov/od/waterman/waterman.jsp

Jan
26
Sat
New Marco Island Historical Museum Exhibit
Jan 26 all-day

Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island

Marco Island Historical Museum prepares for major 2019-2021 exhibit

Key Marco Calusa artifacts together on Marco for first time since 1896 discovery  

Marco Island, FL — July 18, 2018 — The Marco Island Historical Society (MIHS) announces that the MIHS has achieved its 25-year quest to bring “home” on loan the world-famous Key Marco Cat and other rare Pre-Columbian Native American artifacts discovered on Marco Island, Florida in 1896.

Several of the most significant Key Marco artifacts will be brought together on Marco Island for the first time since their discovery by anthropologist Frank Hamilton Cushing more than 100 years ago. The exhibit will be at the Marco Island Historical Museum (MIHM) from January 2019 to April 2021.

A free, public grand opening event for the exhibit will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, during Museum hours. It will include a morning ribbon cutting to celebrate the official opening of the exhibit, live music, an afternoon program/performance on the music of the Calusa by composer and musician Kat Epple and Anthropology Band and family friendly activities.

The Key Marco Cat has been described as one of the finest pieces of Pre-Columbian Native American art ever discovered in North America. At only six inches tall and carved from buttonwood, the Key Marco Cat is a charismatic anthropomorphic feline statuette that has captured the public’s imagination for more than a century. Other important pieces in the exhibition include a ceremonial mask, alligator figurehead, painted human figure and sea turtle figurehead.

The MIHS is mounting the exhibit in collaboration with Collier County Museums, the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The loaned artifacts will be featured within one of the Museum’s permanent exhibits — Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island.

“This exhibition is the culmination of a long-term vision to bring these incredibly important artifacts to Marco Island on loan in order to educate and inspire people of all ages about the fascinating history of our region,” says MIHS Curator of Collections Austin Bell. “It has taken years of planning and discussions with the lending institutions and the continuation of a public-private partnership that includes the Marco Island Historical Society, Collier County and the community.”

Feb
23
Sat
Mother Tongue Film Festival: “The Next Guardian” @ Ground Floor, National Museum of Natural History
Feb 23 @ 6:45 pm – 8:30 pm

The contrasting dreams of two generations clash within the microcosm of an ancient Buddhist monastery in Bhutan, when Gyembo—an ordinary teen—is chosen as the next guardian of the family monastery.

In a remote village in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan, sixteen-year-old Gyembo and his sister Tashi, age fifteen, aimlessly roam while their father meticulously polishes the ancient relics inside the altar of their private monastery. This family has been taking care of the monastery from one generation to the next for thousands of years. Unlike their father, whose life revolves around the monastery, Gyembo and Tashi have other desires. Gyembo wants to become a soccer player, and he is the only confidante for Tashi, who identifies herself as transgender. Following tradition, their father wants Gyembo to carry on the family heritage. He believes that the only way for Gyembo to accumulate good karma is to leave school and dedicate his life to religion and become the next guardian.

Followed by a Q&A discussion with the filmmakers Dorottya Zurbó and Arun Bhattarai, andCommunication and Program Manager for the Bhutan Foundation in Washington, DC, Tshering Yangzom.

This program is offered as part of the Mother Tongue Film Festival, an annual collaborative Smithsonian event initiated by the Recovering Voices Program of the National Museum of Natural History.

Directors: Dorottya Zurbó, Arun Bhattarai

Country: Hungary/Bhutan

Language: Dzongkha

Year: 2017

Runtime: 74 minutes

Category: Documentary

 


Accessibility Information

The National Museum of Natural History is committed to providing inclusive experiences for all audiences. Please contact 202-633-3611 or email NMNHAccessibili[email protected] for access services. To view and print a map with accessible entrances, curb cuts, designated parking, and more for Smithsonian facilities on the National Mall, please download the Accessibility Map here. 

If you would like to have a sign language interpreter or real-time captioning (CART), you should call (202) 633-3611 or send an e-mail to [email protected]. Please allow time to schedule the request by contacting the Accessibility Office at least 2 weeks prior to the program. We will do our best to accommodate last-minute requests.


Date:  
Time: 6:45 PM – 8:30 PM 
Address:
Ground Floor, National Museum of Natural History
10th St. and Constitution Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20013-7012 
United States

If you’d like to attend this event you can purchase tickets online.

Jul
31
Wed
2019 Virtual Student Federal Service Internships
Jul 31 all-day

The Virtual Student Federal Service (VSFS) is the largest virtual internship program in the world!  This year we will offer nearly 3,000 positions with 50+ federal agencies.  VSFS offers unique mentoring and exposure to job opportunities within the U.S. government.

Each year, applications are open to U.S. college students from July 1 – 31 on USAJOBS.gov.  Real experience is waiting for students at NASA, the Smithsonian, U.S. Department of State, Forest Service, Indian Health Service, CIA, National Park Service and others. All the projects on offer are here: http://vsfs.state.gov/ by clicking on “See All Projects” at the top! To #ApplyinJuly to their top three projects, students must log on to USAJOBS, create an account, build a resume, write a statement of interest, and upload a transcript. 

Students play an important role in moving the government forward from analog to digital.  There’s something for everyone: graphic design, research, mapping, videography, foreign language expertise, marketing, community management, writing, calculation, policy planning, app development, and more!  Students can apply to their top three projects from the list here: https://vsfs.state.gov/projects

Selected eInterns should expect to spend ten hours a week on their project from September through May.  This is unpaid, volunteer work, but eInterns make connections that make a difference, gain valuable experience, and sometimes get course credit.  All applicants must be U.S. citizens in student status at a university in the U.S. or abroad.  VSFS is open to undergrad through PhD candidates taking classes full or part-time, in-person or on-line.

Jan
31
Fri
Brandeis Israel Studies Fellowships
Jan 31 all-day

Faculty Fellowship: The Summer Institute for Israel Studies 

June 10–21, 2020 at Brandeis and June 22–July 1, 2020 in Israel

Apply now for this competitive fellowship. Created to address the need for serious and nuanced study of Israel in the academy, the Summer Institute for Israel Studies is a rigorous program that equips faculty members to develop and teach courses about modern Israel in any discipline. Stipend of up to $2,500, plus group travel, accommodations and most meals provided. 

  • ENGAGE with world-class faculty from Israel and the U.S. in a two-week multidisciplinary Brandeis seminar.
  • MEET with leading personalities in public life, the academy and the arts on a 10-day Israel study tour.
  • EXPLORE the complexity of Israeli society, politics and culture.
  • DEVELOP or revise a syllabus to teach at your home institution.
  • JOIN a network of over 335 alumni — teaching at over 200 institutions — supported by a wealth of pedagogical resources and ongoing professional development.

Faculty teaching outside of Israel are eligible for the program. 

Apply online by January 31, 2020. Learn more at www.brandeis.edu/israel-center/siis/index.html. 

If this opportunity is not a fit for you, we invite you to nominate a colleague and to share the fellowship information with faculty members who might benefit from the program.

 

Doctoral Fellowships in Israel Studies at Brandeis University

Full and partial fellowships supporting doctoral students whose research focuses on Israel. Candidates must be accepted into Brandeis University graduate school programs of Anthropology, History, Literature, Middle East Studies, Near Eastern & Judaic Studies, Politics or Sociology. Competitive living stipend with generous health care benefits. Renewable for up to five years. Deadlines vary by department. Learn more at www.brandeis.edu/israel-center/resources/grants-fellowships/graduate-students.html