Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
30
Sun
Robert W. Sussman Award for Scientific Contributions to Anthropology
Apr 30 all-day

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Section H is proud to announce the inaugural Robert W. Sussman Award for Scientific Contributions to Anthropology. As you all know Bob Sussman embodies the science and spirit of Anthropology. From fieldwork on lemurs to human biology to deconstructing the evils of race, his legacy of mentorship, caring, and dissemination of knowledge will be with us forever.

This award recognizes meritorious scientific contributions to the field of anthropology by mid-career anthropologists. AAAS Section H members are encouraged to nominate candidates they feel exemplify the ideals of this award. Nominees do not have to be members of AAAS (though nominators do). Criteria and procedures are described in the attached document.

Nominations and questions should be sent to Section H Secretary Dr. Karen Strier at [email protected]. Deadline for nominations is APRIL 30, 2017.

Jun
2
Fri
Call for Nominations: Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2017
Jun 2 all-day

The Parkes Foundation is pleased to announce the inaugural Geoffrey Harrison prize lecture on human/biosocial sciences.

The Prize Lecture is to be awarded annually in Geoffrey Harrison’s honor to persons who have made a substantial and sustained contribution to the study of human biology and especially biosocial sciences.

Nominations and self-nominations are welcome and must be accompanied by a CV of no more than two A4 pages (set in Arial font size 12). Please submit nominations via email to Dr Alex Alvergne ([email protected]) and Dr Simon Underdown ([email protected]).

The closing date for nominations is Friday 2nd June 2017. The lecture will take place on Friday 3rd November 2017 followed by a drinks reception at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. The Parkes Foundation will contribute to travel and accommodation of the Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecturer.

Oct
10
Tue
Public Service Award
Oct 10 all-day

Honoring Service in promoting Public Understanding of Science and Engineering

THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD HAS EXTENDED THE DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2018 HONORARY AWARDS UNTIL OCTOBER 10, 2017.

The National Science Board is pleased to accept nominations for the Public Service Award, which honors individuals and groups that have made substantial contributions to increasing public understanding of science and engineering in the United States. These contributions may be in a wide variety of areas that have the potential of contributing to public understanding of and appreciation for science and engineering—including mass media, education and/or training programs, and entertainment.

ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates for the NSB Public Service Award should have demonstrated outstanding leadership and accomplishment in meeting the following selection criteria:

  • Increased the public’s understanding of the processes of science and engineering through scientific discovery, innovation, and its communication to the public.
  • Encouraged others to help raise the public understanding of science and technology.
  • Promoted the engagement of scientists and engineers in public outreach and scientific literacy.
  • Contributed to the development of broad science and engineering policy and its support.
  • Influenced and encouraged the next generation of scientists and engineers.
  • Achieved broad recognition outside of the candidate’s area of specialization.
  • Fostered awareness of science and technology among broad segments of the population.

Please note that Members of the US Government are not eligible for this award.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

Nominations for an individual must include:

  1. A current curriculum vita without publications (no more than 3 pages).
  2. A narrative statement (no more than 5 pages) addressing the following:
    1. the candidate’s public service activities in science and engineering, and
    2. the candidate’s contributions to public understanding of science and engineering, as they relate to the selection criteria.
  3. Contact information of candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, phone number).

Nominations for a group must include:

  1. A narrative statement (no more than 5 pages) addressing the following:
    1. the group’s activities, and how it accomplishes the selection criteria for the award,
    2. length of years of the program,
    3. number and type of individuals served by the group’s activities; and
    4. data on the success of the program (if available).
  2. Contact information of candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, phone number).

Reference letters are optional, and up to 3 letters (no more than to 2 pages each) may be submitted on letterhead as a PDF file.

SUBMIT A NOMINATION

Please submit nominations by email to: [email protected]

INQUIRIES

For questions concerning the award, please contact Kathy Jacquart at [email protected], 703-292-5118.

Vannevar Bush Award
Oct 10 all-day

Honoring Lifelong Leadership in Science and Technology and Contributions to the Nation through Public Service

THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD HAS EXTENDED THE DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2018 HONORARY AWARDS UNTIL OCTOBER 10, 2017.

Vannevar Bush Award

The National Science Board is pleased to accept nominations for the Vannevar Bush Award. The Vannevar Bush Award honors truly exceptional lifelong leaders in science and technology who have made substantial contributions to the welfare of the Nation through public service activities in science, technology, and public policy. The award was established in 1980 in the memory of Vannevar Bush, who served as a science advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt during World War II, helped to establish Federal funding for science and engineering as a national priority during peacetime, and was behind the creation of the National Science Foundation.

ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates for the Vannevar Bush Award should have demonstrated outstanding leadership and accomplishment in meeting at least two of the following selection criteria:

  • Candidates must be US citizens.
  • Distinguished himself/herself through public service activities in science and technology.
  • Pioneered the exploration, charting, and settlement of new frontiers in science, technology, education, and public service.
  • Demonstrated leadership and creativity that have inspired others to distinguished careers in science and technology.
  • Contributed to the welfare of the Nation and mankind through activities in science and technology.
  • Demonstrated leadership and creativity that has helped mold the history of advancements in the Nation’s science, technology, and education.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

Nominations must include:

  1. A current curriculum vita without publications (no more than 5 pages).
  2. A narrative statement (no more than 8 pages) addressing the candidate’s activities and contributions related to the selection criteria.
  3. A proposed award citation addressing the candidate’s activities in and contributions to national public service activities in science, technology, and public policy.
  4. Contact information for award candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, and phone number).
  5. Two reference letters (no more than 2 pages each) from individuals familiar with the candidate’s accomplishments, and not affiliated with the candidate’s home institution. Letters should be submitted by email to [email protected] on letterhead as a PDF file.

SUBMIT A NOMINATION

Please Submit Nominations by email to [email protected]

INQUIRIES

For questions concerning the award, please contact Kathy Jacquart at [email protected], 703-292-5118

Oct
12
Fri
Impact of Tool Use and Technology on the Evolution of the Human Mind @ UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA)
Oct 12 @ 1:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Join the live webcast! “Impact of Tool Use and Technology on the Evolution of the Human Mind” is the topic of a free public symposium hosted by the UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) on Friday, October 12th (1:00 – 5:30 pm PT), co-chaired by Tim White (UC Berkeley) and Patricia Churchland (UC SanDiego)

We “behaviorally modern humans” likely emerged more than 100,000 years ago in Africa, spread across the continent and eventually the planet, effectively replacing all closely related and potentially competitive species.  There are many possible explanations for this, but one key to our consistent success in such replacement was the ongoing co-evolution of the human brain/mind with tool use and technology that actually began much earlier – all the way back to the use of simple stone implements millions of years ago – and continues with computers today.

Nine experts in the field will address this important gene-culture co-evolutionary process in anthropogeny at all levels, beginning with the potential link between early stone tool use and the parallel expansion of the human brain.  We’ll explore humans’ control of fire and the invention of projectile weapons, all the way through reading and writing to current-day technologies such as computers and 3D reality, as well as look to the potential future of the human mind under the impact of continually evolving culture.

Comparisons with other living and extinct species will be made, and we’ll touch on other relevant cognitive features unusually well-developed in humans, such as language, theory of mind and cooperation.

Join us to explore answers to a question first posed by Alfred Russel Wallace: How did the human mind originally evolve such remarkable capabilities in Africa, ‘in advance of its needs’? After all, even today no human is born with the genetic capability to make even simple stone tools!

Access the live webcast here on October 12:

https://carta.anthropogeny.org/events/impact-tool-use-and-technology-evolution-human-mind

May
31
Fri
Anthropogeny: The Perspective from Africa Symposium
May 31 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Join the live webcast! “Anthropogeny: The Perspective from Africa” is the topic of a free public symposium hosted by the UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) on Friday, May 31st (1:00-5:30 pm Pacific), co-chaired by Berhane Asfaw (Rift Valley Research Service, Ethiopia) and Lyn Wadley (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa)

Darwin and Huxley first predicted that we humans shared a common ancestor with the African great apes and it is now abundantly clear that Africa was the “cradle of humanity,” with multiple waves of hominins arising on that continent and spreading across the old world, eventually being effectively displaced by our own species, which also arose in Africa.  As Svante Pääbo put it, “we are all Africans, either living in Africa or in recent exile from Africa.”  Given these facts, it is not surprising that the strong emphasis of anthropogeny is on the continent of Africa with studies ranging from genetic to paleontological to archaeological to primatological to climatological to sociocultural.  This CARTA symposium focuses on the contributions of scientists and scholars of anthropogeny who live and work in Africa.

Access the live webcast here on May 31:

https://carta.anthropogeny.org/events/anthropogeny-perspective-africa