Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
27
Mon
Picturing Milwaukee : Sherman Park @ University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin
Mar 27 all-day

Summer 2017 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School

Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Class Dates: June 26 – August 5, 2017; Final exhibit: August 18, 2017

Preparatory Workshop (attendance required), June 23. 2014, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UWM

This summer course provides students with an immersion experience in the field recording of the built environment and cultural landscapes and an opportunity to learn how to write history literally “from the ground up.”  The 2017 field school focuses on Sherman Park, a racially, economically and culturally diverse neighborhood known for its artist communities and active neighborhood groups. This summer we will study residential building types in this neighborhood—everyday residences, duplex and four squares, single- and multi-family units, boarded up homes, refabricated and reused homes, homes transformed into stores and workplaces, homes as works of art, homes remembered in family histories and homes in domestic worlds.

This project seeks to employ the enduring creativity of storytelling, the power of digital humanities, and depth of local knowledge to galvanize Milwaukee residents to talk about their homes as repositories of community memory, spaces of caring and markers of civic pride. Students will learn how to “read” buildings within their urban material, social, ecological and cultural contexts, create reports on historic buildings and cultural landscapes and produce multimedia documentaries.

The five-week course calendar covers a broad array of academic skills. Workshops during Week 1 will focus on photography, measured drawings, documentation and technical drawings; no prior experience is necessary. Week 2 will include archival and historical research focusing on the study of the built environment. Week 3 schedule includes workshops on oral history interviewing and digital ethnography. Week 4 is centered on mapping and archival research. Week 5 and 6 will be devoted to producing final reports and multi-media documentaries.

You may participate in this field school free as a community intern. However if you want university credits you will need to sign up for summer school classes at http://www4.uwm.edu/schedule/

We will be accepting a maximum of 15 students.  You may take a maximum of 6 credits.  Choose from the list below.

ARCH 190 Special Topics: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School.  –3 cr.

ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr.

ARCH 550: Building Types & Settings (Seminar)

ARCH 551: American Vernacular Arch

ARCH 553: Vernacular Buildings/Groupings

ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr.

ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr.

ARCH 391/791 Independent Studies for Undergraduate/Graduate Students (Directed Research). –3 cr.

Nationally recognized faculty directing portions of this school include Jeffrey E. Klee, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael H. Frisch, Professor and Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., and Arijit Sen, Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

Documentary equipment, and supplies, will be provided, but students must be able to fund their own travel, meals and modest lodging accommodations (if they are from out of town). For more information please contact Prof. Arijit Sen at [email protected].
www.Thefieldschool.weebly.com

Apr
24
Mon
William T. Grant Scholars Program
Apr 24 @ 3:00 pm – 3:15 pm

Updated for 2017, our new William T. Grant Scholars application guide is now available online. The Scholars Program is a career development award tailored to early-career researchers in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. The online application will open on April 24, 2017 at 3:00 PM EST. All applications must be received by July 6, 2017 at 3:00 PM EST.

 

Apr
3
Tue
Call for Applications: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards
Apr 3 @ 11:59 pm

CLIR Invites Applications for 2018
Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards

Washington, DC, January 17, 2018 – The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. The national competition, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports digitizing collections of rare and unique content in collecting institutions.

Grants of between $50,000 and $250,000 for a single-institution project, or between $50,000 and $500,000 for a collaborative project, may be sought for projects beginning between January 1 and June 1, 2019.

The Digitizing Hidden Collections program coheres around six core values:

Scholarship: The program is designed to maximize its impact on the creation and dissemination of new knowledge.

Comprehensiveness: The program supports digitization projects that will provide thorough coverage of an important topic or topics of high interest to scholars, in ways that help those scholars understand digitized sources’ provenance and context.

Connectedness: The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution.

Collaboration: The program promotes strategic partnerships rather than duplication of capacity and effort.

Sustainability: The program promotes best practices for ensuring the long-term availability and discoverability of digital files created through digitization.

Openness: The program ensures that digitized content will be made available to the public as easily and completely as possible, given ethical and legal constraints.

The application process has two phases. The initial proposal round is open, and proposals are due by 11:59 pm Eastern time on April 3, 2018. The final proposal round is by invitation. Only those applicants whose initial proposals have been approved by the program’s review panel will be able to submit a final proposal. Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

CLIR will hold a webinar for prospective applicants on Tuesday, January 30, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. Two Q&A webinars will be held on Thursday, February 15, and Wednesday, February 28, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. More information is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.

Council on Library and Information Resources
1707 L Street, Ste 650
Washington, DC 20036, USA

Phone: 202.939.4750
www.clir.org

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.