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Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
27
Mon
Picturing Milwaukee : Sherman Park @ University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin
Mar 27 all-day

Summer 2017 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School

Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Class Dates: June 26 – August 5, 2017; Final exhibit: August 18, 2017

Preparatory Workshop (attendance required), June 23. 2014, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UWM

This summer course provides students with an immersion experience in the field recording of the built environment and cultural landscapes and an opportunity to learn how to write history literally “from the ground up.”  The 2017 field school focuses on Sherman Park, a racially, economically and culturally diverse neighborhood known for its artist communities and active neighborhood groups. This summer we will study residential building types in this neighborhood—everyday residences, duplex and four squares, single- and multi-family units, boarded up homes, refabricated and reused homes, homes transformed into stores and workplaces, homes as works of art, homes remembered in family histories and homes in domestic worlds.

This project seeks to employ the enduring creativity of storytelling, the power of digital humanities, and depth of local knowledge to galvanize Milwaukee residents to talk about their homes as repositories of community memory, spaces of caring and markers of civic pride. Students will learn how to “read” buildings within their urban material, social, ecological and cultural contexts, create reports on historic buildings and cultural landscapes and produce multimedia documentaries.

The five-week course calendar covers a broad array of academic skills. Workshops during Week 1 will focus on photography, measured drawings, documentation and technical drawings; no prior experience is necessary. Week 2 will include archival and historical research focusing on the study of the built environment. Week 3 schedule includes workshops on oral history interviewing and digital ethnography. Week 4 is centered on mapping and archival research. Week 5 and 6 will be devoted to producing final reports and multi-media documentaries.

You may participate in this field school free as a community intern. However if you want university credits you will need to sign up for summer school classes at http://www4.uwm.edu/schedule/

We will be accepting a maximum of 15 students.  You may take a maximum of 6 credits.  Choose from the list below.

ARCH 190 Special Topics: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School.  –3 cr.

ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr.

ARCH 550: Building Types & Settings (Seminar)

ARCH 551: American Vernacular Arch

ARCH 553: Vernacular Buildings/Groupings

ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr.

ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr.

ARCH 391/791 Independent Studies for Undergraduate/Graduate Students (Directed Research). –3 cr.

Nationally recognized faculty directing portions of this school include Jeffrey E. Klee, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael H. Frisch, Professor and Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., and Arijit Sen, Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

Documentary equipment, and supplies, will be provided, but students must be able to fund their own travel, meals and modest lodging accommodations (if they are from out of town). For more information please contact Prof. Arijit Sen at [email protected].
www.Thefieldschool.weebly.com

Dec
31
Sun
Summer Arabic Language and Media Program (SALAM)
Dec 31 all-day

The Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center (SQCC) is delighted to announce its 2018 Summer Arabic Language and Media (SALAM) program, a fully-funded intensive Arabic language scholarship program in the Sultanate of Oman. SQCC supports Arabic language study for U.S. students through its annual SALAM program. This intensive Arabic language program will allow students to gain a deeper knowledge of Arabic, while becoming familiar with Omani history and culture.

Eligibility: All applicants must be U.S. citizens, enrolled in a degree seeking program (BA, MA, or PhD) in spring 2017, and have completed four semesters (or the equivalent) of university-level Arabic coursework.

Program dates: June 24-August 9, 2018
Location: Manah, Oman
Cost: SQCC will cover international travel to and from Washington, DC and Muscat, Oman, program language classes, room, board, SALAM-sponsored travel for weekend excursions, and all entrance fees for program activities. Students will be required to purchase international health and medical evacuation insurance, and arrange travel to and from Washington, DC and their home city.
Classes: Held 8:00 am-1:30 pm Sunday to Thursday.
Outside of class: Students will have access to Omani peer language partners, organized weekend trips around Oman, extracurricular activities, and weekly lectures.
Housing: Shared student housing, provided by the program.
The program also provides: Three meals a day, transportation to and from student housing and the university, internet access, and laundry and gym facilities onsite.

To submit an application, or for more information, please visit the SQCC website. Applications due December 31, 2017

Apr
3
Tue
Call for Applications: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards
Apr 3 @ 11:59 pm

CLIR Invites Applications for 2018
Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards

Washington, DC, January 17, 2018 – The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. The national competition, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports digitizing collections of rare and unique content in collecting institutions.

Grants of between $50,000 and $250,000 for a single-institution project, or between $50,000 and $500,000 for a collaborative project, may be sought for projects beginning between January 1 and June 1, 2019.

The Digitizing Hidden Collections program coheres around six core values:

Scholarship: The program is designed to maximize its impact on the creation and dissemination of new knowledge.

Comprehensiveness: The program supports digitization projects that will provide thorough coverage of an important topic or topics of high interest to scholars, in ways that help those scholars understand digitized sources’ provenance and context.

Connectedness: The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution.

Collaboration: The program promotes strategic partnerships rather than duplication of capacity and effort.

Sustainability: The program promotes best practices for ensuring the long-term availability and discoverability of digital files created through digitization.

Openness: The program ensures that digitized content will be made available to the public as easily and completely as possible, given ethical and legal constraints.

The application process has two phases. The initial proposal round is open, and proposals are due by 11:59 pm Eastern time on April 3, 2018. The final proposal round is by invitation. Only those applicants whose initial proposals have been approved by the program’s review panel will be able to submit a final proposal. Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

CLIR will hold a webinar for prospective applicants on Tuesday, January 30, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. Two Q&A webinars will be held on Thursday, February 15, and Wednesday, February 28, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. More information is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.

Council on Library and Information Resources
1707 L Street, Ste 650
Washington, DC 20036, USA

Phone: 202.939.4750
www.clir.org