My Petrochemical Love

For women of color on Louisiana’s Gulf Coast, everyday environmental and climate activism is entangled with intimate lives.

Witnessing Puerto Rico, Recognition, and Feeling in the Wake of Hurricane Maria

In the moment when I thought tarps were solar panels, I felt the water between the island and the states. It was an affective moment that leads me to wonder, what is the emotional dexterity required of those of us who are insider-outsider ethnographers? Or what are the feelings required of those of us living in diaspora? 

Activist Anthropologist Sentenced to 18 Months in Prison

“If you want to beat me for my heartfelt birthday poem, come and find me at my home. Ask the bodabodamen [male commercial motorcycle drivers] to direct you to Mama Stella’s house with a red gate,” anthropologist Stella Nyanzi wrote at the end of a Facebook post last September.

Performance, Sign Language, and Deaf Identity in Japan

Through 20 years of research experience in Japan, I realized that Japanese Sign Language itself can also be viewed as a performance genre found in the everyday lives of Deaf people, considering the relationship between their presentations of JSL and shared Deaf identity through the consumption of information and values.

Committee on Language and Social Justice Meeting Report

The SLA Committee on Language and Social Justice (LSJ) aims to increase awareness, both within the AAA and among the general public, of the ways that language is implicated in social discrimination; and where appropriate, to respond to language-related injustice.

Responding to “Fake News” in an Era of Hashtag Leftism

In a post-fact landscape, Trump’s highly effective swipes at “fake news” have repurposed a venerable leftist critical tradition into a political bludgeon to which progressives have no real answer, other than to defend a handful of corporate entities as torchbearers of democracy and consensual factual reality. What is needed is an approach that speaks to the real problem, which is that the relentless expansion of capitalized digital media (including but not limited to ‘the news’) is deeply anti-social, and thus anti-democratic. This is a position that spans our political and class spectrum in unexpected ways, as I examine in this article. Ironically, a renewed leftist skepticism of ‘the media’ is thus both necessary to our moment, and potentially an interesting point of political convergence.